How to Dry Chilli

8-String-Chilli-Tiny-Green-Hands

This time of year (end of summer) we have an absolute glut of chillies. Luckily for us, we love the stuff. But even so, there’s only so much chilli you can have in your diet each month.

Drying chilli comes pretty easy for me, we’ve been doing it for years, but it wasn’t until one of the boys I work with came to me the other day looking panicked and saying “I’ve got so much chilli and I don’t know what to do with it!” that I realized that not everyone knows how to dry their own chilli.

So: it’s easy, will take an hour or so, and the only thing you really need to remember is to wash your hands afterwards! Here’s how it goes:

1-Chilli-Plant-Tiny-Green-Hands

Pick a dry morning as wet chillies can go moldy. I picked a day that it hadn’t rained for a while (which is why my chilli bush looks so damn sad!).

2-Pick-Chilli-Tiny-Green-Hands

Get together some secateurs, cooking twine, a needle with a head big enough for the cooking twine, and a bowl. Pick chillies that look a good red colour and a little sad (as though they’re starting to dry).

3-Cut-Chilli-Tiny-Green-Hands

Cut the chillies leaving a centimetre or so above the head.
Once you’ve got them all and you’re ready to thread, ensure your cooking twine is long enough, and pierce the chilli as close to the red as possible without getting the red part.

4-Pierce-Chilli-Tiny-Green-Hands
Push the needle all the way through trying not to break the stem at the sides.

5-Push-Tiny-Green-Hands
Pull the twine through. If the stem breaks just put that chilli aside for either cooking or you can just tie the string around the stem later.

7-Chilli-String-Tiny-Green-HandsSpread the chillies as far or close as you like, it doesn’t make a difference, however if they are wet then they may mould, so ensure they’re all dry.

9-Drying-Chilli-Tiny-Green-Hands

Hang them in a cool, dry, place and then WASH YOUR HANDS!

Some people say that you should use fishing wire because the chilli eats through the twine. I’ve never had that experience. I leave them there for a few months and use them when they look like the store-bought ones.

If you want to then open them and use the seeds to make new chili bushes, do this once they’re dry.

Good luck!

Tiny change for the day: get a chilli plant. They’re practically unkillable and they’re yummy!

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